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Life by Jack Foley--poems   More>>

 

 

 

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Praise for the writing of Jack Foley

Foley is our firebrand experimentalist and he holds his torch high so the reader can have more light. This book makes unique flares and shadows in profound and vivid ways.

~ Michael McClure

Jack Foley's work represents that rare commodity--genuinely avant-garde poetry. He takes the polyphonic forms of Pound and Eliot and pushes them into possibilities open only to performance-based art. This is experimental poetry with depth and intelligence as well as intensity.

~ Dana Gioia

Jack Foley is not afraid to invent new forms, to say things never said in the poem’s domain, to follow his eye, his ear, his nose or his heart...

~ The Poetry Project Newsletter

A fine poet, a man in love with his life, a contributor to the good.

~ Kathleen Fraser


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Imaginary Burden by Michael Hannon--poems   More>>

One of the satisfactions of reading a poet's selected works is the opportunity to observe that poet's artistic growth, the recurrent themes or images, and if we're lucky, the spectacle of the poet maturing into the providence of his poetic destiny. The poems in Michael Hannon's Imaginary Burden: Selected Poems are haunted by the absolute, and the scope of his inquiry is immense. Hannon confronts the nature of consciousness, its liabilities and limitations, which leads him to question the very nature of being; he's always looking at the big picture.

~ Gary Young, from the Introduction

 

 

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Praise for the writing of Michael Hannon

Michael Hannon is an American original — for fifty years he has been writing a deep, unadorned, almost mythic poetry unlike any other poet. Hannon melds a vision of the inner self and the ineffable world, and does so with such craft and illuminating grace. The effect of his poems can be like looking into a desert vastness at night when the landscape is suddenly lit up by a flash of lightning. Hannon takes us back to an ancient source of what poetry tries to do— explore the enigmas and mystery of being. His is a poetry of revelation and wonder.

The owl levitates,
the shark rushes forward
pushing a little wave full of stars,
and the mind falls back on its senses,
having been, beyond words,
in the presence of love.

Like a great temple bell, struck hard, Hannon’s poems will resonate with quietude and beatitude long after you have read them.

~ Joseph Stroud


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A Poem of Miracles by Jerome Rothenberg--poems   More>>

"Jerome Rothenberg is a DNA spaceman exploring the mammal caves of Now."

~ Michael McClure

 

 

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Praise for the writing of Jerome Rothenberg

"In the pages of a Rothenberg book - the poems as much as the anthologies - the world has a coherence. Perhaps this coherence is false ... but we cannot deny that Rothenberg, as so few others, has managed to construct a world.

~ Eliot Weinberger

"For us, Jerome Rothenberg played (and plays) the role Picasso and Braque did for the painters, and Leiris and Bataille later for the French poets .... He is a great figure, who stands above and beyond the schools and tendentiousnesses of poetics: ... a body of work that exhibits what I suddenly realize is an ethical purity, a touchstone for the genuine."

~ Robert Kelly


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Interviews with Allen Ginsburg by Paul Lobo Portugés--interviews   More>>

“One of the most respected Beat writers and acclaimed American poets of his generation, Allen Ginsberg enjoys a prominent place in post-World War II American culture. ”

~ The Poetry Foundation.

“Instead of writing about objects and ideas, the writer is advised to transcribe the workings of their "subconscious" as objects and ideas are grasped intentionally. In "Notes Written on Finally Recording 'Howl'"Allen Ginsberg explains it thus: "Mind is shapely, Art is shapely. Meaning Mind practiced in spontaneity invents forms in its own image–gets to Last Thoughts". The ego is an impediment. Forcing the world through the filter of the "I" reduces externality into easily-manageable representations. It is only through composing with the intentional consciousness that the writer is able to produce authentic work that originates meaning through interaction with the world..”

~ Erik Mortenson, Wayne State University

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Allen Ginsberg with Paul Lobo Portugés:

Portugés: So, getting back to meditation techniques, they help you...

Ginsberg: Calm down, consider what would be the best way of communicating the simplest elements of facts—unprejudiced by my own anger and resentments. If you package your information in resentment and accusation, people won’t swallow it as easily as if you package it in some kind of, or maybe even unpackaged, neutral, benevolent, indifferent attention. If you package it in attention, it’s much better than if you package it in inattentive resentment. You’re not taking into account the psychology of the other guy.

Portugés: This sounds like the Buddhist stress on the aspect of compassion...

Ginsberg: … It’s really compassion toward yourself—that you’re not tearing yourself apart, banging your head against the wall.


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Celtic Light by Lee Perron--poems   More>>

“. . . very wonderful lines here— remarkable and beautiful— full of wisdom and strife as well as health of mind and body, [and] completion, if there is any. Just amazing!”

~ Leonard Cirino, poet, editor Pygmy Forest Press.

“Lee Perron is a highly gifted poet, with a fine sensibility for the tones of nature, and the nature of the self as it expands into the world.”

~ Elliot Sterns, ONTHEBUS

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Praise for the writing of Lee Perron:

". . . very wonderful lines here— remarkable and beautiful— full of wisdom and strife as well as health of mind and body, [and] completion, if there is any. Just amazing!"

~ Leonard Cirino, poet, editor Pygmy Forest Press.


"“Lee Perron is a highly gifted poet, with a fine sensibility for the tones of nature, and the nature of the self as it expands into the world.”"

~ Elliot Sterns, ONTHEBUS


"Lee Perron's poems have show me the path to the dark forest pool where Psyche terrifies her guests, and the poet is, at last, allowed to surrender his vision. Inexorable death, inexorable life--just as he found them, water mixed with the sun."

~ Michael Hannon


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Wayfaring Stranger by Richard Tillinghast--poems   More>>

On The Stonecutter’s Hand, 1995:

“Tillinghast’s poems range confidently among different cultures. He has a sense of history as a living force. His experiments in meter, rhyme, and free verse . . . are important. He is a wonderfully gifted poet, one of the few.”

~ Louis Simpson

On Selected Poems, 2009:

“More outward-looking and international-minded though he is than most contemporary American poets, Tillinghast nonetheless registers his country’s history on his pulse . . . . In sinewy lines and solid stanzas—fruits of a lifetime’s devotion to the craft—Tillinghast’s most recent poems, undoubtedly his finest to date, fuse a sobering sense of mortality with the exhilaration of renewal, indeed rejuvenation, through love.”

~ Dennis O’Driscoll

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Praise for the writing of Richard Tillinghast:

On The Stonecutter’s Hand, 1995:

“Tillinghast’s poems range confidently among different cultures. He has a sense of history as a living force. His experiments in meter, rhyme, and free verse . . . are important. He is a wonderfully gifted poet, one of the few.”

~ Louis Simpson


On Selected Poems, 2009:

“More outward-looking and international-minded though he is than most contemporary American poets, Tillinghast nonetheless registers his country’s history on his pulse . . . . In sinewy lines and solid stanzas—fruits of a lifetime’s devotion to the craft—Tillinghast’s most recent poems, undoubtedly his finest to date, fuse a sobering sense of mortality with the exhilaration of renewal, indeed rejuvenation, through love.”

~ Dennis O’Driscoll


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How Strange It Is To Be Anything At All by Joe Riley--stories   More>>

In How Strange It Is To Be Anything At All,  Hell is where you find it and Joe Riley (a twenty something writer) is your guide. There is authority in his sparse direct language no matter the ambivalent situation.

A new voice is in the offing that suggests Fitzgerald, as well as the hard prose of Bukowski. His stories' contemporary resonance makes one also think of Junot Diaz. One senses that Mr. Riley may indeed become an important voice of his up-and-coming Generation @--or as Mr. Riley characterizes it: "The Generation of Lost, Found, and Lost Again."

Ernst Sturm, novelist, playwright, Knight and
Officer in the French Order and Letters

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Praise for How Strange It Is To Be Anything At All:

In How Strange It Is To Be Anything At All,  Hell is where you find it and Joe Riley (a twenty something writer) is your guide. There is authority in his sparse direct language no matter the ambivalent situation.

A new voice is in the offing that suggests Fitzgerald, as well as the hard prose of Bukowski. His stories' contemporary resonance makes one also think of Junot Diaz. One senses that Mr. Riley may indeed become an important voice of his up-and-coming Generation @--or as Mr. Riley characterizes it: "The Generation of Lost, Found, and Lost Again."

~ Ernst Sturm, novelist, playwright, Knight and
Officer in the French Order and Letters


There is a tangible sense of hopefulness in Joe Riley's book, How Strange It Is To Be Anything At All, something unique.

~ TruongTran, poet and visual artist


How Strange It Is To be Anything At All is part story, part life manual for the young and urban. It's a celebration of a very uncertain age and time in life, basking in elevating realizations and a commemorating existence in general.

~ San Francisco Golden Gate Express


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Border Songs by Sam Hamill--poems   More>>

"Sam Hamill has reached the category of a National Treasure though I doubt he'd like the idea."

~ Jim Harrison

"The shape of Sam Hamill's mind is the shape of both a revolutionary and a monk at work. His sacred text is poetry."

~ Terry Tempest Williams

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Praise for Border Songs:

"Sam Hamill has reached the category of a National Treasure though I doubt he'd like the idea."

~ Jim Harrison


"The shape of Sam Hamill's mind is the shape of both a revolutionary and a monk at work. His sacred text is poetry."

~ Terry Tempest Williams


No one—I mean no one ever—has done the momentous work of presenting poetry better than Sam Hamill... [his poetry] is no less than essential.

~ Hayden Carruth


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Under Such Brilliance  by Kevin Sullivan--poems   More>>

When Kevin Patrick Sullivan reads, you hear Celtic courage, ageless and refreshing, singing in the lines. Kevin's voice reflects acuity of vision, vitality, honesty. His work ethic is inspiration for all poets, young and old. He is director of the nationally respected "Corners of the Mouth" readings at San Luis Obispo's venerable and beloved mecca of the arts, Linnaea's Café."

Ray Clark Dickson, First Poet Laureate,
City and County, San Luis Obispo.

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Praise for Under Such Brilliance:

When Kevin Patrick Sullivan reads, you hear Celtic courage, ageless and refreshing, singing in the lines. Kevin's voice reflects acuity of vision, vitality, honesty. His work ethic is inspiration for all poets, young and old. He is director of the nationally respected "Corners of the Mouth" readings at San Luis Obispo's venerable and beloved mecca of the arts, Linnaea's Café."

~ Ray Clark Dickson, First Poet Laureate,
City and County, San Luis Obispo.


"Kevin Patrick Sullivan wakes up every day in love with the world. He is an ecstatic descendent of Rumi, but his poems illuminate the roots of joy growing in a more difficult terrain. These spare light-filled hymns sing the praises of a sweet journeyman's everyday life- from working on the assembly line at Ford Motor Plant in Detroit to simply acknowledging the sacred act of breathing. These poems prove that the mystic still walks among us, works with us side by side – mining exuberance in beautifully muddy boots."

~ Dian Sousa, past Poet Laureate
for the City of San Luis Obispo.


"To listen to Kevin Patrick is to awake into the original astonishment of the poetic word. His verb stems like a flash from a hidden mystery which is beyond heart, brains and intellect. The good fortune of my destiny has made me the witness of this miracle."

~ Hernan Castellano-Giron, past Poet Laureate
for the City and County of San Luis Obispo.


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Beauty Like A Rope  by Leslie St. John--poems   More>>

My body has been hostage to an idea," cries Leslie St. John, and even though this charismatic woman never loses touch with the physical fact of the body in the world, she is at her essence a metaphysical poet. "I'd like to rename every body part," she insists in the first poem here, in the hope that doing so may bring her "one day nearer to what is unnamable." It's a brave imagination that can face the body it lives in as both vehicle and obstacle, and a strong mind that can transcend that dualism. But having lost one eye in an absurd accident ("She Washed My Hair" tells the harrowing story), Leslie St. John has let the poet in her see with a unique third eye, one that sees with an accurate, compassionate, wisdom-inviting gaze. Her language is contemporary, precise and warm with breathing; her poems offer a music that sounds intimate even when one read aloud alone. Of special note is the heartbreaking "Elegy for John Mark, 2002-2004," a sequence on the death of a nephew that turns at the end toward an unearthly lyrical beauty. But in Leslie St. John's world, beauty is like a rope: it can rescue or kill.

~ Jim Cushing

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Praise for Beauty Like A Rope:

My body has been hostage to an idea," cries Leslie St. John, and even though this charismatic woman never loses touch with the physical fact of the body in the world, she is at her essence a metaphysical poet. "I'd like to rename every body part," she insists in the first poem here, in the hope that doing so may bring her "one day nearer to what is unnamable." It's a brave imagination that can face the body it lives in as both vehicle and obstacle, and a strong mind that can transcend that dualism. But having lost one eye in an absurd accident ("She Washed My Hair" tells the harrowing story), Leslie St. John has let the poet in her see with a unique third eye, one that sees with an accurate, compassionate, wisdom-inviting gaze. Her language is contemporary, precise and warm with breathing; her poems offer a music that sounds intimate even when one read aloud alone. Of special note is the heartbreaking "Elegy for John Mark, 2002-2004," a sequence on the death of a nephew that turns at the end toward an unearthly lyrical beauty. But in Leslie St. John's world, beauty is like a rope: it can rescue or kill.

~ Jim Cushing


Leslie St. John writes lyrical, entrancing poems.

~ Kevin Clark, Cal Poly College of Liberal Arts


Leslie St. John's poem, "Things that Bend," arrested me, made me eager to keep reading (Is that not part of the writer's obligation to the reader?) the poem from its first line, in which there is a lot of strong but subtle music: inch/window/sill are assonantal half-rhymes, curl/worm half rhyme, and worm/window add a little consonantal rhyme. By the fourth line, after establishing a place, she takes us to another place, the past, I believe, and an other enters the poem. It's a love poem, a poem about time and its damage, I loved the lines,

What bends short, bends long—
Doesn't break. Neck of tulip, waning
Clothes rod. And, yes, the rules.

That the heart "splinters into tributaries" is an original way of saying something all of us come to learn if we live a conscious life.

~ Thomas Lux


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Who On Earth  by Michael Hannon--poems   More>>

A very good poet indeed, and certainly one of the few Tantric writers in any language who is both profound and witty.

~ Kenneth Rexroth


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Praise for Who On Earth

Michael Hannon’s poems are full of the resonance that comes only from an understanding of silence. His poems are self-revelatory, humane, and seamless, good in the ear like a kiss that brings the blush of understanding, the kind of poems one wants to lift out of a book and into memory.

~ Sam Hamill


He writes a fine longer lyrical poem and is equally master of the short. His tone is the heart, the warm praise of inevitable and appalling things.

~ Lee Perron


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instructions for the living by Mariko Nagai--poems   More>>

"Mariko Nagai creates a richly evocative voice that is both immediate and reflective."

~ James Ragan

"Starkly recounted with a clear, cold tone, these stories carry the weight of a survivor bearing witness."

~ Publishers Weekly

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Praise for instructions for the living:

"Nagai has a voice and vision to be reckoned with .... These stories will change you, change what you know, change how to imagine the lives of people around you."

~ Jonis Agee, judge,
G. S. Sharat Chandra
Prize for Short Fiction


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Tilting Point by Peter Dale Scott--poems   More>>

"Not since Robert Duncan's Groundwork and before that William Carlos Williams’ Paterson, has New Directions published a long poem as important as Peter Dale Scott's."

~ James Laughlin

"[Peter Dale Scott's work] extends the scope of poetry, reclaiming some of the ground lost since Dryden, lost even since Pound¦ A true invention, it should be of interest to all who read poetry."

~ Thom Gunn

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Praise for Peter Dale Scott

"Peter Dale Scott combines his politics with his poetics, and we are richer for it. The poems are deceptively simple. One run-through is generally enough to crack their intention and meaning, but their brilliance comes after several readings. I travel past the obvious to the subtle interconnectivity of things in Scott's world, while he travels as a senior citizen through the world with his sensitivity and wisdom up front..."

~ Andrew Vaisius


"Not since Robert Duncan's Groundwork and before that William Carlos Williams’ Paterson, has New Directions published a long poem as important as Peter Dale Scott's."

~ James Laughlin


"[Peter Dale Scott's work] extends the scope of poetry, reclaiming some of the ground lost since Dryden, lost even since Pound¦ A true invention, it should be of interest to all who read poetry."

~ Thom Gunn

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